How to win the People’s Book Prize (or come a close second)

Children's finalists PBP 2016

The 7th Peoples Book Prize award dinner took place last night in the splendid Worshipful Company of Stationers’ Hall in the City of London. With 36 finalists, publishers and guests, the atmosphere was happy and supportive – there is something liberating about a prize decided entirely by popular vote.  Every finalist called up to the stage was there because lots of people loved and voted for their book; good news for authors, publishers and above all, the public, who’ve shown that books and reading are things to get excited about.

It was great to meet up again with fellow former prize winner, Giles Paley Philips, whose entry, Little Bell and the Moon, is truly magical, with Giles’s beautifully cadenced poetry matched by Iris Deppe’s outstanding illustrations. In fact the standard of the finalists overall was so high, I’d prepared myself for a stiff competition and wasn’t too downhearted when Milky Moments by Ellie Stoneley scooped the prize.2-DSCN3115

A new category, Best Publisher, was introduced this year, for which I was delighted to discover that my publishers had been nominated.  Congratulations Sarah Taylor of Troubador, it was brilliant seeing you at the dinner, even if Troubador didn’t end up winning!

Which sums up my experience of the evening overall: it really wasn’t just about the winning. What mattered was being there at the finals, meeting other authors and publishers who’ve come from all over the world, and celebrating together.

Thank you, all you wonderful people who backed The Tragickall History of Henry Fowst,
IMG_6578 2enduring stoically my stream of PBP reminders over the last few months. Without your support the book would never have got as far as it did and if it didn’t quite equal Ante’s Inferno’s achievement of winning the People’s Book Prize 2013, being a Finalist in 2016 is a pretty close second.

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So who won? Find out tonight!

Well, folks, today’s the day…. the winners of the People’s Book Prize 2016 will be announced at Stationers’ Hall, London, tonight.  As one of 12 finalists in the Children’s category, I am looking forward to this evening with much excitement and a good dollop of nail-biting.  Thank you all you wonderful people who sent in your votes.  The wait will be over SOOOOOON.

Here’s a lovely article that appeared in Saturday 9 July Oxford Mail.

 

 

Delighted to have been interviewed by the People’s Book Prize as one of the FINALISTS (voting closes 10 July – only 5 days left!)

The People's Book Prize

Griselda Heppel⌈ Vote Now ⌋

In the lead up to The People’s Book Prize 2016 we caught up with author Griselda Heppel to talk about her Children’s book

The Tragickall History of Henry Fowst

Griselda grew up in Germany, the land of black forests, red and white toadstools, gingerbread houses and lonely castles bristling with turrets. With Grimms’ Fairy Tales as her backdrop, the magic and stories have become a firm part of Griselda’s make-up.  After graduating from Cambridge, Griselda worked in publishing, got married, had four children and was somewhat distracted for a few years. But in the back of her mind stories grew and in 2012 she released Ante’s Inferno. Returning with The Tragickall History of Henry Fowst (publication August 2015) tackles the Faustian legend, interweaving Elizabethan magic, demons and historical mystery into the everyday life of 13-year-old Henry, who’ll do anything to overcome his problems, even follow…

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